Augmented arpeggios

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djangology
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Augmented arpeggios

Post by djangology »

Just curious about augmented arpeggios. I try to be a purist as much as I can and I tend to think that I should stay away from these when playing gypsy jazz because I haven't seen any "gypsy jazz" lesson material that covers this topic (probably for good reason).

My fear is that learning and using augmented scales might make me sound "jazzy" rather than "gypsy".

Can anyone comment, and if they are ok to use, can you provide an example of how to practice them with Djangos "two finger" approach. Also, if you say that they are ok to use then PLEASE provide an example of where Django actually uses them.

Thanks to all. :-) This posting is out of curiosity and I am not trying to generate interest in learning these arpeggios.
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Re: Augmented arpeggios

Post by Djazz Nomad »

djangology wrote:Just curious about augmented arpeggios. I try to be a purist as much as I can and I tend to think that I should stay away from these when playing gypsy jazz because I haven't seen any "gypsy jazz" lesson material that covers this topic (probably for good reason).

My fear is that learning and using augmented scales might make me sound "jazzy" rather than "gypsy".
Can't for the life of me think why you think these arpeggios are not purist or too jazzy, on the contrary. They're also really easy for the two finger thing. I think that Romane's 'Exercises de style' covers this in detail.
As for examples of Django, just listen to Anouman, there's the lovely augmented triplet thing, you know like the diminished thing but easier! Oh, and of course only two frets at a time now.
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Post by djangology »

Romanes Nashville video and Romanes l'Esprit Manouche materials do not mention augmented arpeggios, as far as I remember. I will take a look at Anouman.
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Post by Manouche »

There are some examples of this, admittedly Django himself uses partial scale and then rarely, but the arpeggio more commonly and in Anouman there is a sweep picked wholly augmented chord chromatic passage! -pick the bones out of that :wink:

[edit]
Time is obviously non-linear in the internet, in the 2mins it took me to post this the above two arrived!
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Post by Djazz Nomad »

djangology wrote: I will take a look at Anouman.
Better to take a LISTEN. 8)
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Post by emackenz »

Diminushing is a classic example of Django's augmented work i think. The solo is beautiful - as always..!
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Re: Augmented arpeggios

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djangology wrote:My fear is that learning and using augmented scales might make me sound "jazzy" rather than "gypsy".
This type of talk really frightens me and would have appalled Django.
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Post by Thrip »

Here's a couple more examples of Django using augmented arpeggios:

Intro to "My Serenade" 1937

Intro to "Moonglow" 1935

As to whether they sound "gypsy" or not I think Django may have picked the use of whole tone scales from Debussy or someone similar. I happen to think they sound fantastic, but if you're concerned about sounding like a floppy-haired French Romantic you should steer clear of them. :lol:
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Post by Zoot »

Sweet Chorus - has a whole shedfull of augmented sections in it. In the chorus funnily enough making it not sweet at all. Funnny that
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Post by justjack »

Gypsy humor, Zoot, gypsy humor!
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Post by djangology »

I have a good friend who I jam with, that uses the augmented arpeggio approach heavily and I think he sounds a bit bluesy. The augmented sound "seems" to have a pentatonic scale kind of effect, from me listening to him play. I might be wrong though... its possible that he actually is using blues/pentatonic scales while he is playing but he never mentions them and so it is my best assumption that he is not directly playing them. All I know is that I don't want to sound like he does. The truth is that I want to "try" to sound more like Django himself. :?
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Post by RICK-D15 »

djangology wrote:I have a good friend who I jam with, that uses the augmented arpeggio approach heavily and I think he sounds a bit bluesy.
Cool. I like to add a little bit of mojo myself.
The truth is that I want to "try" to sound more like Django himself.
Don't we all, but we never will. If you can find that place where you're having fun and they're having fun, it all comes out in the wash. I suppose if your playing in an environment (or to an environment) that is very scrutininzing of your playing, as to whether or not you're following the right rules, etc.., it can be more challenging to let your hair down. My impression from listening to Django's work is that he articulated more of a "no rules" paradigm than one dominated by a rigid structure. His sound is pure crystalized spontenaity.

I'm not talking about Le Pompe, of course, which I agree plays an extremely important percussive role in this style of music, and has to approximate a certain standard. Also with soloing there are scales, arpeggios, triads, chords, ornaments which must be learned with long and hard practice, but they're just the raw material. The real gold comes from you being you, and pulling something out of your own hat.
"It's all one big note" - Frank Zappa
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Post by RayIan »

Well said Rick, well said.
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