Is it a lack of interest?

Whats happening on the Gypsy Jazz Scene today

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Rene
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Post by Rene »

I've just caught up with all you Schnuckenack fans, and yes, I'm a total convert. I love the rootsy back to basics flavour, and there are some rare gems here. Nice to hear the combination of electric and acoustic guitars together, and to hear a great violinist - there's not enough of them around.
weltiviolin
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Post by weltiviolin »

Hi all.

The German gypsy-swing scene is totally amazing. Travelled to Koblenz in southern Germany few months ago, not long after Samois and there was a Sinti festival going on the day I got there with musicians of the family name Reinhardt including Schnuckenack! (...got the photo to prove it..!) There's actually a lot going on over there and as much a tradition as anywhere else (France, Holland, UK, etc) Stayed with mate of mine Lulo (family name Reinhardt - of course) whose uncle is Schnuckenack and cousin is Mike Reinhardt. All of these guys are seriously amazing musicians, got to play with few of em through Lulo, which was awesome! There was also LULU Reinhardt at this festival who played with Titi Winterstein. The German Gypsies are pretty modernised but from what could gather from Lulo living in Germany they always have the terrible history of the Holocaust to contend with as well as a still-present tension with the mainstream German community which never seems to really go away which might explain why you don't hear bout them too much, stick to their own clan a lot - either that or they're doing lots of gigs. Lulo came down to Australia few years ago (Sydney has the hugest gypsy-swing community imaginable of about three people), has an Australian girlfriend...Totally top guy, if anyone ever wants to know pretty much anything about the German gypsy-swing community he's the guy to contact, speaks good English, has a website. If you look up his name on google, you'd be sure find his website and can contact him. There's stacks of CDs of all these guys, think there's like an 8-disc box set of Shnuckenack recordings that you can buy. Lulo's got his own self-titled project and also plays in a band with his Dad "Gitanos" which is like a pop-Latin cum Gypsy-Kings/Swing group with Romanes lyrics. Like said there's fair bit going on...
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djangology
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Post by djangology »

dude, I think Matcho Winterstein kicks ass. are the Wintersteins from Germany? mainly, i love his choice of arpeggios. :-) also, I have a CD of Lulo and Bawo Reinhardt playing and its called "I Gitanos"... it sounds German/Spanish sorta....
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nwilkins
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Post by nwilkins »

Matcho Winterstein is from Lorraine
stublag
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Post by stublag »

nwilkins wrote:Matcho Winterstein is from Lorraine
Yes, Matcho is from Nancy--i had the pleasure of hanging out with him in London recently.
Hes a fantastic player;the strongest hands i've ever seen--can play any tune in any key!
He hates recording unfortunately but he has a few projects planned with Samson and our own Colin Cosimini
BTW-matcho means 'fish' in Sinti not 'matcho' :-)
stu
Ando
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Post by Ando »

Y'all should see Ted in them funny knickers the Germans wear, the ones with the embroidered suspenders and the grey flannel socks with bells on them.

But I'll forgive him this and stand closer to him to raise ein grosse alte bierstein to the German Gods of Swing. THEY ROCK THE HOUSE. They are PARTY ANIMALS. Okay, I'll grant you I've never seen any of them live, save Tchavolo on some video, but just LISTEN to the damn recordings! Their rhythm sections are hewn out of granite. They stomp like snorting bulls in the earth. They always sound like they just got back from chopping wood in the forest, mustaches covered with frost, ready for some FRICKING SCHNAPPS, BITTE!

And over the impenetrably solidity of the rhythm section, there's Schnuckenack's violin, which does not have its edges sanded off, a la Parisienne, but instead sounds like its horsehair was just pulled off the horse. It sounds like a grown man shedding tears. It sounds like the voice of survival, which it certainly is, and it sounds like smoke. When I listen to Schnuckenack, I don't hear the slightest trace of "influence." Instead, I hear playing that makes me imagine what his facial expression looks like on the album covers: haughty, scornful, experienced, ultimately unconquerable.

There is something punk about the Alsatian sound. It is curt. Declarative. Even in Schnuckenack's rhapsodies, there's a sense of defiance. Perhaps this is why they don't sound out of place alongside gritty punk recordings from the 70's. Their music isn't sweetness and swing with ribbons and bows and millefeuille layers -- it's smoke, wool, and hands that are rough from work.
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plankity
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Post by plankity »

count me as one of the German fans - Hansche, Titi, Lulu et al.

can anyone tell more about Kussi?

N--
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quecumbar
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would love to have them at le q but will the tickets sell!

Post by quecumbar »

yes it seems some guys get fixated on a few players there are dozens of world class players but they still need an audience to be able to play here and physical support
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plankity
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Post by plankity »

I got see Joscho Stephan at the Spirit of Django, Lincoln Center show last Wednesday: he was as very, very dynamic entertainer! He, his father and I spoke of the dilema with German Gypsy artists reaching the big US market - because Angelo, Samson, Ludovic and Florin were right nearby, they spoke in hushed tones but indictated some resentment in the fact that the French based players are monopolizing the limited market points (Amazon will only carry 'so many' manouche style recordings, so they go with what sells, plain and simple). The upside to this tale is this: Joscho knows he can sell, if people know who he is... so he's touring: a lot! And he's very good (as I said).

I consider him to be part of the younger guard, but moreover, a continuation of the great German Gypsy tradition - Lulu, Hans-che, Titi, Martin Weiss: he has the very same 'ballsy', right between your eyes style and impact, even if he isn't a full blooded Gypsy.

His Live in Concert 2005 CD is great: I bought last copy from him that night.

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fmason
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Joscho

Post by fmason »

Joscho is a great player, untouchable technique. IMHO he's a bit of a Stochelo Clone, but hey Stochelo is great too!

2 cents...
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radiotone
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Recommendations

Post by radiotone »

I've noticed raves about the Germans. I'd love a short list (5 or so?) of cds that I could get from online retailers.

To place further demands, I'd really like to start out with players who don't shred to much (although I gather that the Germans in general aren't technique demons) - I'm into plenty of space between the notes and solos that sort of sing rather than overwhelm (a la Django and Fapy).

Cheers,

Neil
TedGottsegen
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Re: Recommendations

Post by TedGottsegen »

radiotone wrote:To place further demands, I'd really like to start out with players who don't shred to much (although I gather that the Germans in general aren't technique demons)
Sorry, Germans are the original technique demons. Häns'che Weiss, Lulu Reinhardt, Titi Winterstein are the ones who started the "gypsy burner" trend. If you're looking for mellow players, Germany probably isn't the place to look. Although you might be interested in Martin Weiss' album "Savoir Vivre", featuring Kussi Weiss, who was influenced by Stochelo, but is still a very reasonable player that uses technique where appropriate.
radiotone wrote: I've noticed raves about the Germans. I'd love a short list (5 or so?) of cds that I could get from online retailers - I'm into plenty of space between the notes and solos that sort of sing rather than overwhelm (a la Django and Fapy).
Then don't buy a Titi Winterstein CD. Try these and if you're ready for others than I can provide a list.

1. Anything by Schnuckenack Reinhardt, although "Starportrait" is I think the best single CD you can get.

2. Martin Weiss: "Savoir Vivre" with Kussi Weiss, or "Maro Drom" with Romani Weiss

Best,

Ted
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FSUGypsyJazz
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Post by FSUGypsyJazz »

I second the Schnuckenack Starportrait album. That album is great.
Keep Swingin!
Caleb
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radiotone
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Re: Recommendations

Post by radiotone »

TedGottsegen wrote:
Sorry, Germans are the original technique demons.
Ah, interesting. Somewhere in my mind I'm remembering reading that the German school is more raw. That obviously doesn't preclude playing fast. Would this be an accurate description?

To further clarify, the players tend to like to rip, like the Rosenbergs, but with less polish?

Also, is the rhythm and/or la pompe different?

Cheers,

nh
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radiotone
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Re: Recommendations

Post by radiotone »

radiotone wrote: Somewhere in my mind I'm remembering reading that the German school is more raw.
Duh. If I had reread the thread, I'd have answered my own question. Been out of town for a few days.

Okay, Germans are manly-man, rock solid rhythm players who can also set their fretboards afire, and like to tote wood, drink terpentine schnapps, and live in unheated, mossy caves. Or something like that.

Remind me of how Tchavalo fits in to the aesthetic of the lesser known players discussed above.


Cheers,

nh
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