Dunn guitars

Makers of Gypsy Jazz guitars

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guitarbuilder
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Post by guitarbuilder »

Hello...about the 'pine' in guitars. Ihave used many kinds of spruce, red cedar, yellow cedar, douglas fir and Port Orford cedar all to my liking. I havent encountered pine that I feel I could go with...I know theres something out there but I have never seen it...Theres some really interesting pines in Australia maybe someday....
If it was strong enough, I would use it....

Kind regards, Michael Dunn
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justjack
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Post by justjack »

Michael,

I've just been looking at your Rhythm Futur, and it's a beaut (this would be the pining in guitars, I suppose), but I was wondering-does the raised center of the back had a specific acoustic purpose? Well done, either way!

best, Jack.
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nwilkins
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Post by nwilkins »

I have heard from a friend that JP Favino now uses pine tops on his guitars.
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Post by guitarbuilder »

Hi Jack,
The back of the Rhythm Futur model came about because I had these beautiful rosewood panels from my log which were not large enough to make a complete back so I superimposed them on the lower panels making the lavered back. The result is that the sound lost some of that characteristic " punch " but got smoothed out and made it a guitar really suited to playing contemporary jazz. The sound is really full and a little more blended than in my other guitars. It is a unique sound for me and I had enough sets to build a limited edition of 5 guitars. I since have been able to squeeze one more set and will use it as the back for a 5 course tenor guitar this fall.
Thank you for your interest...Michael Dunn
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Post by guitarbuilder »

Hi....about "pine"....you have to be careful how people use this term...I have seen spruce translated as pine fron the French...Both words have the same letters in them Epinette, and Sapin. Even in my early days in Spain, they used to call Red Cedar " Pino Canadiense" And we used to call German spruce " Pino de Allemagna " instead of the proper "Abeto"
Who knows?.....Michael D.
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Post by TedGottsegen »

guitarbuilder wrote:Hi....about "pine"....you have to be careful how people use this term...I have seen spruce translated as pine fron the French...Both words have the same letters in them Epinette, and Sapin.
Sadly the source of the rumor, me :oops: fell prey to just that problem. Somewhere along the lines I got the translation wrong. Favino uses épicéa for tops which I confirmed yesterday is spruce. According to a fairly recent catalogue he uses "French Pine" for the tops of his archtop model, but in light of this refound err in translation I wonder how accurate that is?
bwilkins
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Post by bwilkins »

May I add yet one more vocabulary note?
"sapin" = fir

"pin" or "bois de pin" = pine

"epinette" = ?????

But that's the old problem w/ those of us in the natural sciences: common names vary all over the globe. Good example, the Acadian french in my region call eastern larch "pinette rouge": which would translate red spruce, no less!!! :)

bw
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justjack
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Post by justjack »

Michael,
Thanks for the reply; I'm looking forward to seeing the tenor.
(And if anyone's looking for great commentary on the misnaming of flora and fauna, look to Nabokov for wit and wisdom-the man's hard to beat.)
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My new Dunn

Post by drDAve »

Hi folks-I was browsing through and thought I'd put in a word about my new guitar-an Ultrafox that I received from Michael 3 days ago. It is a new model for him-small oval hole (petite bouche), cutaway, rosewood back, spruce top, mahogany neck. The innovation is an internal sound reflecter made of very thin curved wood. My thoughts:

Beautiful to look at-great attention to detail, with a very cool metal and wood tail piece, purfling that alternates between ebony and boxwood. Looks much like the prototype on his website, but a few subtle differences make it unique. As for the sperzel tuners-they are great-solid, smooth, well made. I'd rather restring a flathead over a slothead any day of the week. It's not traditional, but so what.

Playability-Very even tone up and down the neck, good seperation. The neck is a different profile than I'm used to on my other guitars, but it's comfortable and the action is about perfect using the light strings I have on it (JP nuages 11s).

Sound- Solid rhythm punch, but what really strikes my ear is single note lines, especially above about the fifth fret- they just sing out and really cut through any rhythm back up (yeah, I've already had the guys in for some jamming and showing off the new toy.) Octaves just blast out! I can't wait to hear this thing in a year.

Ive played about six of Michael's guitars-not a clunker in the bunch, and all beautifully made. Shelley Park is our other local Selmer-Mac style luthier and I think she makes wonderful instruments as well-just not quite as interesting or cool as Dunn's. I have no experience with the European builders-no doubt there 's alot of fabulous lumber out there. What really sold me on the sound of the Ultrafox was getting a chance to hear Robin Nolan play one in an ensemble with several other very nice guitars. Granted, RN would likely be able to play any half decent guitar well, but the tone really drew me in. The whole thing is quite subjective, but I'm damn happy with this new guitar. Worth searching out.

I'd also add that Michael is a pleasure to work with and that his guitars are very much a bargain-I can say it now that I've got mine! Given that people like Jeff Traugott, Symogi, Kevin Ryan etc in the world of standard steel strings guitars are all making models pushing the $10,000.00 level he could no doubt get away with charging more.

Sorry for such a long post-sounds like a damn commercial-but I like this guitar.
chap
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Post by chap »

Michael has a new guitar model posted on his site. Wow. Pretty stunning looking guitar.
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Jan Primus
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Post by Jan Primus »

chap
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Post by chap »

Actually the one I was talking about is on the Gallery 2 page and is called the Photonic Grand Slam
TedGottsegen
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Post by TedGottsegen »

chap wrote:Actually the one I was talking about is on the Gallery 2 page and is called the Photonic Grand Slam
Man....I feel like I'm having an acid flashback from a trip I had back in the early '90's.... 8)
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woodshedder
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Post by woodshedder »

all right, so who's ready to buy an old strat? :?
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Jan Primus
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Post by Jan Primus »

That guitar is a trip isnt it? I truly like what he does with wood. He is just a grand experimenter. He does the same thing with his music. I got to hear Michael and the Hot Club of Mars play yesterday. It was quite good. His violinist is a trip! Much more Eastern European in style and more edgey as far as stepping away from the Django Paris thing and backstepping toward the Hungarian rootsa. I enjoyed them.
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