Do you read music?

The first thirty years are the worst

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Do you read music notation?

Yes, I sight read quickly.
7
28%
Yes, but I read less than one measure per minute.
12
48%
No, I am a tabalature guru but I am learning to read.
2
8%
No, I figure tablature is all I will need to noodle around.
4
16%
No, I used to read but now its all locked within my brain.
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 25

Do you read music?

Postby djangology » Wed Aug 06, 2003 9:05 pm

I wanted to get an idea of what the percentage is of us have the ability to read real music notation rather than just tablature. So please, everyone, take a stab at answering this one truthfully. :-)
Last edited by djangology on Thu Aug 07, 2003 3:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Wallace » Wed Aug 06, 2003 11:36 pm

I've answered that I can sight read quickly but must qualify by saying it depends on the music. Amongst other things I play bass in a big band and we regularly have music thrust in front of us and are expected to play straight off but then bass isn't usually too difficult.
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Postby Djazz Nomad » Thu Aug 07, 2003 8:01 am

I think there should be a sixth category for those like me who don't read dots or tab. :idea:
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Postby djangology » Thu Aug 07, 2003 3:09 pm

Ah... i forgot that one option. Well, answer with your best shot then. I knew that I had forgot something. :-)
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Postby Jan Primus » Thu Aug 07, 2003 6:22 pm

I can read faster than one measure a minute, but I would not say I read quickly either...
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Postby Phydeaux3 » Fri Aug 08, 2003 1:12 pm

What dots and tabs??
It's all instinctive!!
Alors! Un, deux...
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Postby Caballero » Fri Aug 08, 2003 4:28 pm

Djazz Nomad wrote:I think there should be a sixth category for those like me who don't read dots or tab. :idea:




Who gives a shit when you make guitars like you do. :lol:
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Postby Jan Primus » Fri Aug 08, 2003 5:39 pm

Just how does he make guitars?
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Postby justjack » Sat Aug 09, 2003 8:14 pm

"I can read faster than one measure a minute, but I would not say I read quickly either..."

I'm somewhere in here, too. I suppose I should make it more of a priority, but I tend to read just to get going, then work by ear. With this music especially I find reading can be a pain because of the abundance of accidentals.
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Postby Djazz Nomad » Sun Aug 10, 2003 8:07 pm

Jan Primus wrote:Just how does he make guitars?


Well, you know, wood,glue, funny gold things to tighten the thin metal things that you hit, or stroke gently, as is your wont. 8)
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Do You Read Music?

Postby Brainbell Rambler » Mon Aug 11, 2003 2:59 am

First teacher I had taught from transcriptions in standard notation. He thought that tab was The Devil's Work, the lazy man's method of learning. Always insisted that written music was a great source of information, a form of literature unto itself. I had to learn to read to comprehend his lessons. This was back in the early seventies; folk blues was still popular up in the provincial areas like Connecticut, where I was living at the time. He (John Raycroft, the teacher) was trying to teach me to play in the fingerpicking style of old blues guitarists like Mississippi John Hurt, Elizabeth Cotton and Etta Baker. I was too rambunctious to practice and dropped from the tuition rolls. Later I learned via the hard way that he was right about reading music. (And I will be eternally grateful to Maestro Raycroft for teaching the basics about prewar blues guitar: the more complex ragtime styles of Blind Blake, Gary Davis and others was much easier to grok, if you know what I mean.) :roll:
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Postby justjack » Mon Aug 11, 2003 5:52 am

One thing we haven't touched on is the lack of rhythmic notation in tab; to me, this is the big difference. Reading standard (even if you don't know the tune), you can still get a decent idea of what's going on; with tab, it's all very vague. Maybe someone should come up with an amalgam- tab transcriptions with note flags and tempo direction. Or maybe someone has?
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Postby bwilkins » Mon Aug 11, 2003 12:43 pm

Hi again Just Jack

Yer right of course. But dont ya think Robin Nolan's tab solves a lot of that problem? That's what I like about it, at least for me it was the 1st tab I had seen that also indicates the duration of the notes, rather than merely string & fret numbers.

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Postby CB » Mon Aug 11, 2003 1:43 pm

Yep, one measure a minute is about right for me, well, maybe a little faster if it is one note at a time, but if it involves six note chord melodies, well...... I find tab easier and faster.

A lot more could be done with tab than we see currently, though arguably "standard" tab is sufficient if you know the tune. One good thing is that anyone with a basic computer can write it out for publication where ever. I suspect this is what keeps the format simple and basic. I agree, the RNT style tab is an improvement over "standard" tab. If RNT were listening however, I might offer the following contructive suggestions.

- Come up with a way to keep the fret number on the intended string. I find my eye jumping from the string to the fret numbers across the top of the string "staff" slows reading down. Maybe do away with the "X" for quarter/eight notes and put the fret number inside a circle. Likewise with with the diamond for half/whole notes.

- Include the time, key and tempo intended. Add dynamic indications (these could be in English (or whatever) instead of Italian.

- Make it look better graphically. Compared to standard notation, most tab just isn't very inspiring to look at, RNT tab included

- Combine the chord charts with the tab.
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Postby bwilkins » Mon Aug 11, 2003 2:53 pm

Good points CB -- as long as it doesn't become too cluttered. Personally I haven't had too much trouble with the fret numbers at the top. But key signatures, time signatures, chord names -- make sense, especially so as to have it all on one page.

I just got a copy of the Horowitz book. He uses the 'old-fashioned' Tab, which was harder to go back to after using RNT for a long time.

I'm not at all a good reader either of classic notation. Besides, it's not that suitable to our instrument, compared to almost every other instrument. At least to this novice. It takes me too long to work out which sequence of strings/frets work best to play a particular phrase, while in TAB somebody else has already worked that out for you.

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