How to get to Carnegie Hall

The first thirty years are the worst

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How to get to Carnegie Hall

Postby justjack » Fri May 02, 2003 5:25 am

Lately I've been noticing my atrocious approach to practicing (i.e., all too often just running over the same old favorite tunes), and it got me wondering-do any of you lot have regular schedules that you stick to? And, if so, what are they? (Djangology, I know you're in on this one; you're the only guy I know who not only practices, but has a website to guilt the rest of us into it!) Lastly, try to mention if you're mostly rhythm or lead. Thanks, all.
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Postby Shepoid » Fri May 02, 2003 1:30 pm

I get up in the morning, make a cup of coffee, pick up the box and just start picking up where I left off the day before. I practice as much as I can.
I think that's all you can do.
I practice at least 3 hrs a day but generally 5 hrs and play out at least one night a week. Generally 3 though.
Playing and practicing are very different things but as you know very much symbiotic . Study and composition are interwoven it seems with all the above to me as well.
Practicing is the journey and playing is the party or parties along that route. That's about as simple as I can say it without getting too heady.
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Postby justjack » Sat May 03, 2003 3:40 am

From Shep:
"I get up in the morning, make a cup of coffee, pick up the box and just start picking up where I left off the day before."
That tends to be exactly my trouble, I think. I need some sort of schedule; as it is, I tend to not branch out until something really strikes me, and while I think those things are always worth following up on, I'd like to be a bit more directed. Maybe I should just start taking lessons again?
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Postby Shepoid » Sat May 03, 2003 3:46 am

Taking lessons is always a good thing.
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Postby TedGottsegen » Sat May 03, 2003 5:25 am

Taking lessons will do nothing but help and I would suggest you find a jazz guitarist as he/she will invariably be able to pass along a wealth of info - much more than a rock or blues guy.

If you have people to jam with, that will help because it will put you under pressure to come to the table each day or week with something completed. For me, as a rhtyhm guitarist, I learn tunes. As many as possible. For Samois this year I've got a list of 30 that I want to have memorized in addition to the standards which everyone already plays. This is also in addition to the new tunes that we're working on in my trio. Once I learn a tune, I figure out different patterns and ways to play it. As with anything you just have to set goals for yourself and attain them.

Best,

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Postby justjack » Sat May 03, 2003 5:49 am

Thank god Ted wrote:
"Once I learn a tune, I figure out different patterns and ways to play it."

I'm sure this sounds obvious to a lot of folks, but for a while I thought I was becoming obsessive. Once I learn a tune, I can spend weeks working out all the different inversions, substitutions, and partial chords you can play, just so that I don't always bring the same backup to an ever-changing solo. I really feel there's as much invention possible with rhythm as there is with melody.

As for lessons, I think I'm going with Michael Daves, a local guy. There doesn't seem to be any Django-centric teacher in these parts, though if anyone knows better, please let me know. Daves has a site: www.michaeldaves.com I think-should anyone else want to check him out.
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Postby Phydeaux3 » Mon May 05, 2003 7:44 pm

Every second half hour over a 14 hour period for the last 36 years.
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Postby Rich » Tue May 06, 2003 6:40 pm

This may make me look really stupid.....but hey i'll ask anyway.......who here are professional players (as that is your only source of income)? cause the amount of practice you say u do i can't see how you could have another job. (i.e. I never have a 14 hour period free in my week)
I am a student and I manage about 3 hours maximum playing a night, simply from lack of time, and need for sleep, and neighbours who complain.
As for how to practice i think different methods for different people. When i ain't got a guitar at hand i can sit and think of different ways to play stuff, voicings etc. it suprising how much u can improve without actually playing. maybe thats just me.
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Postby Phydeaux3 » Tue May 06, 2003 7:40 pm

Rich wrote: When i ain't got a guitar at hand i can sit and think of different ways to play stuff, voicings etc. it suprising how much u can improve without actually playing. maybe thats just me.


I know a guy who can work out inversions, substitutions, scales, modes patterns etc. around chords, work out arrangements all in his head. He came into a music shop as I was noodling around and stood in front of me and directed me in 3 different voicing versions of Manhattan. Absolutely amazing.
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Postby Harry the dog » Fri May 09, 2003 9:18 am

Hi folks Interesting to the varied way in which we all reach the holy grail of Gypsy Jazz. I ve recently began takeing lessons and have found that this is has helped greatly, it has also reinforced that the more I learn the less i know But there you go thats jazz I suppose :?
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Postby djangology » Fri May 09, 2003 5:00 pm

the Colin Cosimini book has helped me a lot in this regard. i compare his chords with the Robin Nolan chords and other charts that I find and between all of those I learn a huge amount about chord substitution in any particular song... at this point, to a certain extent I can come up with some pretty creative voicings and its all because i put down my guitar and i sit and read the charts and compare chords...
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Postby Shepoid » Fri May 09, 2003 5:39 pm

I recomend as a base text the book, Guitar Lore by Dennis Sandole'
It covers all the basics
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