Staccato or legato?

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Staccato or legato?

Postby djangology » Tue Apr 01, 2003 11:48 pm

Would you consider the gypsy jazz picking style as legato or staccato? Do these terms even apply when speaking about the gypsy approach to picking?
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Staccato

Postby Jan Primus » Wed Apr 02, 2003 4:06 pm

I think it most definitely leans toward staccato although some of Django's licks are certainly fluid. Even when it flows nicely, it is crisp and clean.
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Postby justjack » Fri Apr 04, 2003 7:56 am

Agreed. It seems to depend mostly on the atmosphere generated by the tune itself...some are staccato, some legato, some both. For instance, a good deal of tunes begin with a rubato or legato intro, then, at the head, launch into a relatively staccato melody. I'll See You in My Dreams, maybe, would be a good example.
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Postby djangology » Thu May 15, 2003 3:42 pm

yeah, well i am right now putting Chez Jacquet into Powertab as my own arrangement and i am needing to put a few stoccato notes in there during the song and they seem to be used to create some tension before a quick triplet usually.... sorta cool how that stoccato thing works... also during the B part of Montagne Ste. Genevieve i believe the first bar is all stoccato notes... and thats sorta intresting also because tension is being strung at that point in the song...
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