QUOTATIONS

Exactly what it says on the tin

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Postby Thrip » Mon Mar 07, 2005 10:22 pm

"There are two things one should never try in life: incest, and morris dancing" - Noel Coward
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Postby Zoot » Tue Mar 08, 2005 5:24 pm

"This tunes in D minor - The saddest of all keys" - Spinal Tap
A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any invention in human history, with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila.
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Postby stublag » Wed Mar 09, 2005 7:21 pm

zoot wrote:"This tunes in D minor - The saddest of all keys" - Spinal Tap




Hmmm....
Personally i've always been a B minor guy....(Si tu Savais etc etc)

Not ONE quotation but many are to be found in my current must read book by Alain de Botton(with an 'n') called "the Consolations of Philosophy"(Penguin)
Its like a therapy book co-written by the greatest minds in history--none of this NEW age shit--i recommend it if you want some truly enlightened views on life.
I find myself going back to my favourite chapter-- "the consolations for unpopularity"-- time and time again..... :-)

In the end quotations are a bit like 'licks' aren't they?---you should try and come up with your own.
Stu
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Postby djangology » Wed Mar 09, 2005 7:37 pm

"The appetite for reduction can never be satisfied." - Bradley J. Sealy

I like this quote in terms of playing guitar. People are always trying to reduce guitar playing to simpler terms. :-)
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Postby stublag » Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:11 pm

djangology wrote:"The appetite for reduction can never be satisfied." - Bradley J. Sealy

I like this quote in terms of playing guitar. People are always trying to reduce guitar playing to simpler terms. :-)



Always?
Are they?
Some are, thats true
(the great Bill Frisell for one--hes worth a thousand Jimmy Brunos' in my book)

....... But,in the end, the number of notes isn't relevant if they all MEAN something, as in Django's case.

(at the opposite end of the 'scale' is Jimmy Rosenberg as usual).

Sometimes Jimmy's 'more' is less;Sometimes 'less' is more;sometimes 'less' is just.... er ......... 'less'!

Django used many notes when fewer would have sufficed--
-BUT that doesn't mean that EVERY one of his notes didn't matter!
It was a common criticism (still is actually, outside of narrow GJ critical circles) of Django that he was too 'decorative' and 'ornamental'.
.....to quote US mainstreamer Jimmy Raney :
"Django?........thats mandolin!"
As i see it.... with really great musicians 'simpler' can mean many notes or fewer--its the creativity that matters.
Sadly 'less is more' is too often used today as an excuse for lack of real mastery of the instrument--for every one intuitive genius for which 'less' is REALLY 'more'--there are thousands of pseuds who use it to justify a lack of dedication to the craft of playing an instrument honestly.
Its this attitude that ,imo, has destroyed the once wonderful world of 'Rock' as well.
Stu


PS-Zoot? maybe you should move this somewhere else on the forum?
Its just food for thought......
and it HAS been quiet here recently !! :-)
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Postby djangology » Wed Mar 09, 2005 9:53 pm

Its this attitude that ,imo, has destroyed the once wonderful world of 'Rock' as well.


i agree with this as well except i think most of the fault in that lies in studio engineers "over-processing" things and putting in too many layers of sound into the finished product...

you might argue that heavy metal had too many notes but I just have to say that with 25 years of hindsight that it was brilliant...
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Postby stublag » Wed Mar 09, 2005 10:27 pm

djangology wrote:
Its this attitude that ,imo, has destroyed the once wonderful world of 'Rock' as well.


i agree with this as well except i think most of the fault in that lies in studio engineers "over-processing" things and putting in too many layers of sound into the finished product...

you might argue that heavy metal had too many notes but I just have to say that with 25 years of hindsight that it was brilliant...


I don't think the recording process comes into it at all--i don't think you understand what i'm trying to say........
--i detest heavy metal,particularly the massively overrated Vai and Malmsteem.
--i loved Zeppelin,Tull, because those guys really had something to say from the heart--and were linked to all the pasts best music(ie british Folk,classical, U.S blues and Jazz)
Stu
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Postby Cuimean » Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:40 pm

They had something to say about hobbits, that's for sure. :wink:

Weasel Walter, of the very weird band The Flying Luttenbachers, had this to say on the state of rock: "[P]unk, 30 years later, has ruined everything. Punk rock pretty much said, 'Anybody can do this,' and unfortunately now everyone is doing it, and music is suffering as a result of that. I mean, I come out of punk, but let's face it: there's a punk ethos ? punk with a lowercase p ? and then there's Punk?, which is, as we know, total fucking bullshit. I mean, how many more songs with barre chords do we need? From my perspective, as an intelligent person who happens to like intense, fucked-up, weird music, punk rock does not cut it anymore. Punk rock was very relevant at its onset, and a lot of it was very inspired. Now it's just a style, the way a lot of other things are. I honestly think that bands like these are reacting against the 'we had one rehearsal and here's our stupid band' thing that's clogging the underground, this laissez-faire disposability of rock."

Food for thought.
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Postby djangology » Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:51 pm

...which still proves that the appetite for reduction can never be satisfied... after every complex musical movement always seems to appear a reincarnation of the simpler forms of music, like punk, grunge... or something like that.
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Postby stublag » Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:09 am

[quote="Cuimean"]They had something to say about hobbits, that's for sure. :wink:


Well
Surprisingly, i admit, i was,with more than a few others on this forum, at the best part of the beginning of Punk in the UK!
--My god!!!... i even hung out with Pete Shelley(practically my next door neighbour) of the Buzzcocks!.
Even saw the Sex Pistols at The Gallery in Manchester--helped Sting out with his shit bass sound as well--at the "International"
This isn't bragging btw--i'm far more chuffed at knowing and playing with (a true punk!) Matcho Wintersterin and Ritary and the wonderful Tchau Limberger.

I'd say that all worthwhile punk was basically worthless which,btw, is how its originators would want it to be remembered-----perversely.
I'm amazed at the current tolerance of this,lets face it, pretty trivial movement within Todays musical world--
Punks much vaunted 'Energy' gets you SO far--but sooner or later the beautiful head of intellect, talent and discipline raises its not so ugly head :-)
Thank God!
Stu
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Postby Teddy Dupont » Thu Mar 10, 2005 10:32 am

stublag wrote:--i don't think you understand what i'm trying to say........
--

.........Errr :? :? - Just go through that once more from the beginning Stu.
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Postby nwilkins » Thu Mar 10, 2005 4:10 pm

Cuimean wrote:
Weasel Walter, of the very weird band The Flying Luttenbachers, had this to say on the state of rock: "
I honestly think that bands like these are reacting against the 'we had one rehearsal and here's our stupid band' thing that's clogging the underground, this laissez-faire disposability of rock."


bands like which? The Flying Luttenbachers?
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Postby Carter O'Brien » Thu Mar 10, 2005 6:32 pm

Punks much vaunted 'Energy' gets you SO far--but sooner or later the beautiful head of intellect, talent and discipline raises its not so ugly head Smile


true enough, although I give props to the Clash as they kept growing muscially. out of all the punk/ 80's music I listened to as a teen, only the Clash are still in my regular rotation.
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Postby stublag » Thu Mar 10, 2005 6:52 pm

Teddy Dupont wrote:
stublag wrote:--i don't think you understand what i'm trying to say........
--

.........Errr :? :? - Just go through that once more from the beginning Stu.



Teddy
I blame those substances....
But...its not the first time you've accused me of being 'slightly incoherent' is it?
But your a good guy :-)
Stu
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Postby Cuimean » Thu Mar 10, 2005 7:14 pm

nwilkins wrote:bands like which? The Flying Luttenbachers?


Whoops...that line needed a little more context to make sense. Yes, he was talking about the Luttenbachers, as well as bands like Hella, Orthrelm, and Upsilon Acrux...all very complex, hyper-composed, and usually very loud bands. Here's a link to the entire article:

http://www.sfbg.com/noise/45-02/brutal.html

I agree with Stu's assesment that raw energy will only carry you so far, but like Carter says about The Clash, there are bands who've continued to grow since that initial burst. The Dutch band The Ex are a great example; they started as a Crass-style anarchist punk band in the early '80's and have grown into a formidible experimental music unit, doing projects with everyone from Han Bennink to The Metropole Orchestra.

So what does this have to do with gypsy jazz? I dunno. Going back to some of Stu's earlier comments, perhaps we can conclude that preoccupation with form can lead to declining quality of content. Not a very revelatory revelation. Sorry.

Speaking of messing with the form, did you folks hear that Bireli recently recorded an album with Joey DeFrancesco?
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