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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2003 11:41 pm
by TedGottsegen
Thrip wrote:
TedGottsegen wrote:
Teddy Dupont wrote:..........and copying Django solos note-for-note.


Personally I'd like to hear Stochelo stretch out a bit, take a few risks. The best playing I've seen him do is in those jam videos where he's more relaxed and less concious of putting on a "show".


Sadly I think that Stochelo is partly to blame for this seeing as most of the recent studio albums don't give anywhere near an adequate impression of what he does when just playing with the Rosenbergs. The most recent recording with the pianist should do much to change this. But again, it's the old arguement (and the same label that George Benson got stuck with) of recording commercial material versus genre specific material. While the styles may be different, the same can certainly be said about Bireli and the fusion/avant slop he perpetrated throughout the late 1980's and 1990's.

There is a lot of bootleg concert stuff on CD floating about where he does just that - improvises his arse off. Stochelo is way beyond the guitarist he was back in the "Seresta"/"North Sea" days. He's a great improvisor and composer and I think it certainly says a lot when you hear lots of young gypsy kids out there playing Stochelo solos (not Stochelo playing Django) note-for-note.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2003 1:59 pm
by Teddy Dupont
TedGottsegen wrote:. But again, it's the old arguement (and the same label that George Benson got stuck with) of recording commercial material versus genre specific material.


I have no particular objection to musicians recording "commercial music" - after all many of the excellent recordings Django made were built around fairly banal pop anthems of the day as was the case with Wes many years later. It is the interpretation of that material which sometimes leaves me with problems. I have a recording of Stochelo playing "Guitar Boogie Shuffle" which makes one almost yearn for the Duane Eddy version!

However, to digress even further what on earth does Stochelo do with the Isham Jones composition "There Is No Greater Love" on Seresta? It is quite different to any other version I have ever heard. Does he intentionally change it beyond all recognition or is he actually playing a completely different tune? I know this question was raised some time on Yahoo but I'm sure the response here will be much more erudite and constructive.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2003 5:45 pm
by TedGottsegen
Teddy Dupont wrote:However, to digress even further what on earth does Stochelo do with the Isham Jones composition "There Is No Greater Love" on Seresta? It is quite different to any other version I have ever heard.


Agreed. Chordally it follows the opening track on the album "There Will Never Be Another You" very closely.

Teddy Dupont wrote:Does he intentionally change it beyond all recognition or is he actually playing a completely different tune? I know this question was raised some time on Yahoo but I'm sure the response here will be much more erudite and constructive.


Good question. I don't know where he learned it, but I believe that since that version is unique to Stochelo, than perhaps he learned it from someone else and liked it enough as it is and never thought of digging up a different version. Conversly, could it have simply been a tune that somone selected as filler with an arrangment tossed together on the stop? I doubt it, considering the use of dynamics in the solo is brilliant. The way he plays on the dynamics raising throughout the tune only to reach a massive climax before he takes the head out. One of the most sophisticated solos on the album with a nary a Django lick to be found.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2003 6:14 pm
by Thrip
TedGottsegen wrote:There is a lot of bootleg concert stuff on CD floating about where he does just that - improvises his arse off. Stochelo is way beyond the guitarist he was back in the "Seresta"/"North Sea" days.


That's good to hear. I have to admit that I gave up on his recordings after the two you mention above. Even when he's not playing Django solos his playing (on those recordings) sounds worked out in advance.

TedGottsegen wrote:He's a great improvisor and composer and I think it certainly says a lot when you hear lots of young gypsy kids out there playing Stochelo solos (not Stochelo playing Django) note-for-note.


Without doubt he's a brilliant guitar player, and you're right, that does say a lot.